The Iron Spy

Book cover: 'The Iron Spy'
Author(s): 
Joan Stromberg
Copyright: 
2003
Publisher: 
Ecce Homo Press
Binding: 
Softcover
Number of pages: 
165 pages
Subject(s): 
Grade / Age level: 
Review: 

In this first book of the new series The Danville Chronicles, Joan Stromberg has found a fun and exciting way to teach faith to your children ten years and older. It will capture their imagination and keep their minds thinking.

This book takes place in the town of Danville, Pennsylvania in 1875. The biggest Iron Mill in town is owned by Mr. Graves. It has just exploded and Mary Mulhearn, an Irish immigrant, and her blind friend Kathleen Dodd are trying to find evidence that Mary's father, Mr. Mulhearn, is innocent of blowing up the Iron Mill and becoming a Molly Maguire. Although Mary's family knows he would never turn into a Molly Maguire and blow up the Iron Mill were he worked before it exploded, they also know that their realization of his innocence alone will not be enough to win the trial against Mr. Mulhearn.

Then one day, to make things more puzzling for Mary, a man who calls himself Sean McGinty shows up at Mary's door and says he is an immigrant right off a boat from Ireland and finds a place to stay at the Mulhearns' house. But Mary doesn't believe his story and is on his case. Mary and Kathleen go through adventures and trials, they find a detective book under a man's bed, they notice a ring that has shown up on two people, they spot a man in the town graveyard during the night, and they learn how to spy on a spy. They also have many more questions than answers at one point. Who is Sean really? Is he a Molly Maguire or is he on Mr. Graves' side? Who blew up the mill and why? If you want to know the answers to these questions and more and if Mary cracks the case and finds out whom Sean really is, you will have to read The Iron Spy for yourself.

What better kind of book could you ask for than a Catholic history mystery that will not let your mind wander or let your eyes drift from its thrilling pages?

Perspective: 
Catholic
Additional notes: 

Reviewer age 12

Review Date: 
1999
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