Authors

Happy Times in Noisy Village

Book cover: 'Happy Times in Noisy Village'
Author(s): 
Astrid Lindgren

The charming and humorous adventures of the children of "Noisy Village" are continued in this sequel, recently reprinted by Bethlehem Books. The children's adventures and creative pranks and business ideas make for a fun family story. Speaking from experience, I can attest to the fact that it's an excellent book to curl up with on a chilly fall afternoon with a couple of little girls on your lap. (My eight year old boy hung around to listen too.)

The Children of Noisy Village

Author(s): 
Astrid Lindgren

This story is about a nine year old girl and her friends and brothers. They all lived in Noisy Village, which was really three farms with seven children running around and being noisy which is why everyone called it Noisy Village. In South Farm lived a boy named Olaf and his little sister Kersten. In Middle Farm lived Karl, Bill and Lisa. In North Farm lived two girls named Britta and Anna. They have a few adventures with the grumpy shoemaker, have trouble coming home from school on time and have many other hilarious adventures, but you will have to read the book to find out about them.

Lord of the World

Book cover: 'Lord of the World'
Author(s): 
Monsignor Robert Hugh Benson

Lord of the World, written in the early part of the 20th century, is an intelligent and Catholic fictional extrapolation on the trend towards Modernism described and condemned by Pope Pius X in Pascendi Dominici Gregis and Lamentabili Sane

Dawn of All

Book cover: 'Dawn of All'
Author(s): 
Monsignor Robert Hugh Benson

This book, together with its counterpart Lord of the World, is an early venture into the "speculative" genre of fiction. Written in 1911, it could be considered early science fiction with its descriptions of future technology, but it is really much more a religious and philosophical exploration of the effects of belief systems on society.

My Heart Lies South

Book cover: 'My Heart Lies South: The Story of My Mexican Marriage (Young People's Edition)'
Author(s): 
Elizabeth Borton de Trevino

Elizabeth Borton de Trevino is best known as the author of children's stories, especially I, Juan de Pareja which won the Newbery Award in 1966). Long before all that, in the 1930s, she was simply Elizabeth Borton, a modern American lady, living in Boston and working as a journalist, when she was given an assignment in Monterrey, Mexico. There she met, was courted by and eventually married a native by the name of Luis Trevino.

Smith of Wootton Major & Farmer Giles of Ham

Author(s): 
J.R.R. Tolkien

Tolkien has a habit of making stories that are just plain fun to read. And a sneaky little tendency to make them exceedingly rich too - offering many levels of interpretation and withstanding rigorous study by philosophers, theologians, philologists and anyone else. But all the time they remain delightful - and offer a healthy dose of poetic knowledge even to the most superficial readers. Both of these stories are 'old-fashioned' in style.

The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien

Book cover: 'The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien'
Author(s): 
Humphrey Carpenter (ed.)

This book is not a "must read", but it is an enlightening read (best for high school and up). I have not read any other compilation of letters like this, so even the concept was new to me. There isn't a format, a thesis or an argument to unify the book. Rather, it is the life, work and times of Tolkien which generate the letters. He writes to his wife, his children, fans of his work, his publishers and various friends. The book is a subset of his letters (edited with the help of his son Christopher).

J.R.R. Tolkien

Book cover: 'J.R.R. Tolkien: The Man Who Created the Lord of the Rings'
Author(s): 
Michael Coren

This is a surprisingly good, very readable biography of one of the most popular authors of all time. J.R.R. Tolkien was born in South Africa, the son of an English banker. After her return to England and the death of her husband, Tolkien's mother, Mabel, converted to Catholicism. Shunned by relatives after this, she was assisted by a kind parish priest who took care of her two sons after she died at age 34.

The Princess and Curdie

Author(s): 
George MacDonald

The Princess and Curdie continues the fantasy saga begun in MacDonald's The Princess and the Goblin. This novel gets off to a slower start than the first one in the series, but it is just as attention-holding. Curdie, the young hero, is put to the test in this story, and must prove himself both brave and loyal, whilst remaining trustworthy and honest. In this story, Curdie is given the gifts of a magic of his own that can only be used for others and a faithful but unusual traveling companion.

The Princess and the Goblin

Author(s): 
George MacDonald

The Princess and the Goblin is a classic fantasy novel written in the late 1800s by George MacDonald. The story features all of the elements of a great fairy tale: a young princess, a brave hero on the verge of adulthood, subtle magic, and more goblins than can be counted. There is enough adventure to keep the story moving, but the plot is not overwhelming or difficult to follow. There is nothing to recommend a caution for: no rough language, no adult situations, and very little violence.

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