18th century Biographies

George Washington

Book cover: 'George Washington'
Author(s): 
Ingri and Edgar Parin D'Aulaire
Copyright: 
1936
Publisher: 
Beautiful Feet Books
Binding: 
Softcover
Number of pages: 
60 pages
Subject(s): 
Grade / Age level: 
Review: 

It is just like the D'Aulaire's to create a story (complete with beautiful full-color illustrations) that would be interesting and appealing to small children and yet teach more about the character and upbringing of "the Father of Our Country" than most textbooks. The story covers our First President's early childhood - growing up in Colonial America - his adventures (and character) as a young officer during the French and Indian War and, of course, his role in the American Revolution and as president.

Review Date: 
1999
Reviewed by: 

The Swamp Fox of the Revolution

Author(s): 
Stewart Holbrook
Copyright: 
1959
Publisher: 
Random House
Series: 
Landmark
Binding: 
Sewn Hardcover
Number of pages: 
180 pages
Subject(s): 
Grade / Age level: 
Review: 

Back in print! This interesting and entertaining story is a biography of Revolutionary War General Francis Marion and his significant but oft-forgotten role in winning our independence. Marion is a very interesting character I should have learned about in my history classes in grade school! He fought the British against what seemed like impossible odds (in the Southern Colonies) and ended up playing a very significant role in winning the British surrender. His courage and mercy (he allows his prisoners go free if they promise not to rejoin the other side) are admirable.

Additional notes: 

A Landmark book with complete index

Review Date: 
1999
Reviewed by: 

Lydia Longley, The First American Nun

Author(s): 
Helen A. McCarthy
Illustrator(s): 
John Lawn
Copyright: 
1958
Publisher: 
Book Farrar, Straus & Cudahy
Series: 
Vision
Binding: 
Sewn Hardcover
Number of pages: 
187 pages
Subject(s): 
Grade / Age level: 
Review: 

Dramatic changes are in store for Lydia Longley when her father brings home a new mother for his children. At the time she is twelve-years-old. This change, however, proves to be small in comparison to the traumatic event that changes her life forever when she is twenty.

While everyone is busy preparing breakfast, a party of Abenaki Indians raids their peaceful farm, killing her parents, brothers and sisters. Miraculously, they spare her life along with her younger brother and sister. Sadly, her three-year-old sister does not survive the treacherous journey north.

Upon arriving in Ville-Marie (Montreal, Canada), Lydia begins her new life. Having grown up in a serious Puritan family, the changes are rather startling. What is life like in her new home? What are these strange customs these French Catholics do? Who is the mysterious Jeanne LeBer? How did she survive the long and arduous trek from Groton, Massachusetts to Ville-Marie at the hands of her Indian captors?

While remaining faithful to the actual events of her life, Lydia Longley, the First American Nun presents an interesting and inspiring account of her life. The reader is also introduced to Blessed Jeanne LeBer (Leber). Lydia lived from 1674-1758.

Perspective: 
Catholic
Review Date: 
2-18-2008
Reviewed by: